Planets

Dezarate II 
General Bedford’s Confederacy really encompasses only a single planet, but it's a well-chosen one. Dezarate II is a dry planet where agriculture is difficult, but its mineral resources and abundant geothermal and wind power, coupled with a population of ex-soldiers, makes it a natural weapons-manufacturing hub. The planet is surrounded by a vast cloud of debris – the remains of the entire Confederate Navy. This layer of space junk makes it impossible to bombard the planet, and enough pieces of it are still armed and manned that no ship can make it to the surface without the General’s permission.
 
Crockett II
Crockett II is an example of the typical “new worlds” that the Alliance has been settling along the borders since the war.  Significant urban unrest on the Core Worlds manifested during the Galactic Civil War, and the success of Confederate recruiting efforts was only one symptom of this.  Some Alliance factions argued that the rigid caste systems, stagnant economies, and high-tech job markets of many Core Worlds made class unrest inevitable, and that new immigration opportunities had to be opened to the Core’s underclass.  Significant resources have been spent on incentivizing immigration to worlds like Crockett II which had previously been considered marginal.  Crockett II is a warm, dry world with some dangerous fauna.  It’s suitable for both mining and agriculture, but neither on a scale that has ever attracted the megacorps.  On the other hand, it’s ideal for enterprising individual farmers and prospectors.  The Alliance has paid for spaceports and for a high-tech train system which travels between the ports and the most promising parts of the planet.  The Alliance has offered subsidies to Core citizens who immigrate here.  It’s also settled troops captured during the war here (those who had no homes to return to) and offered commutation of sentences to some criminals convicted in Core World courts – they can immigrate to a planet like Crockett II instead of going to prison or paying a crippling fine.  This results in a population mix which could be quite dangerous, but most of the inhabitants are too busy just surviving to cause much trouble.  There are several “new worlds” like Crockett II.  Most of them are functional frontier societies, much like the Wild West.  But one or two have “gone bad” for unknown reasons.
 
Telemachus III
Telemachus III started as a “new world” like Crockett II, but something went wrong.  The planet’s inhabitants slipped into madness until the whole world became a horrifying wasteland of senseless brutality.  Since “Telemachians” was a mouthful anyway, people began calling them “Amoks.”  Most stay on the planet’s surface, huddled in corners moaning or torturing one another for sport.  But a few have made it into space and become the most feared pirates of the Galaxy.  Theories abound as to what exactly happened to the Amoks – environmental factors? An alien disease? Unethical Alliance experiments?  But after what happened to the crews of the first two survey ships to try to find out, the Alliance has forbidden anyone to approach the planet for any purpose whatsoever.
 
Telmun IV
Telmun IV, a rocky and mostly barren Alliance border planet, is mostly known as the site of the historic Battle of Telmun IV and the subsequent Massacre of Telmun IV.
 
Isis VIb
Isis VIb  is technically pronounced “Six-B,” but it’s often known by its nickname/alternate pronunciation “Vibe.”  Vibe is the second-largest moon of a gas giant in the Isis System (and so the planet Isis VI appears as a very large, green-and-yellow swirled “moon” in the sky of Vibe.)  Although Isis VI is a long way from its sun, VIb’s position as a large and close-orbiting moon generates a great deal of geothermal energy, keeping the moon quite warm (and quite volcanically active).  VIb is a warm, wet world covered in lush swamps and jungles.  When it was discovered by humans, it was already populated by Saurians, with a fairly sophisticated Neolithic society.  The humans built a modern city and traded modern technology for rare herbs with potent medicinal and recreational effects.  It also became a popular site for safaris, due to its dinosaur-like megafauna.  When the war began, Vibe already had a vibrant economy based on the export of legal and illegal pharmaceuticals.  Several tribes of Saurians had been civilized and incorporated into the societies of Vibe’s sprawling cities.  Vibe remained neutral in the war, and the medical supplies they provided to both sides gave them the leverage to remain so.  Now Vibe is part of the Alliance, but only grudgingly so.  This world’s stubborn independence, corrupt officials, prosperous smugglers, mazelike cities, and trackless jungles make it an ideal place to hide from the authorities – at least for a while.
 
Crown of Ptah
Technically speaking, this is not a planet at all.  Rather, it’s a ring system surrounding a brown dwarf which is part of a binary system – like Saturn, only three times the size (it’s twenty times the mass, though.)  Ptah is the brown dwarf (bigger than a gas giant, smaller than a star).  The rings are his Crown.  The rings are composed of objects ranging from individual ice molecules to rocky moonlets a mile or more across.  The system is accessible to, but not directly located on, major trade routes.  Within the rings, sensors have extremely limited range and any pilot who doesn’t know the area must proceed very slowly to avoid destroying his ship.  It is, in short, an ideal hideout for pirates.  The Crown is host to many infamous pirate ships.  The Alliance has promised to wipe them out, but so far has not succeeded in doing so.
 
Ymir IV
Graaagrh! (Most humans say something like “Grog”) is a Yeti from the icy, mountainous, high-gravity world of Ymir IV.  Other races have little reason to come there, and the Yeti live isolated, low-tech lives.  But when the Alliance attempted to annex their system and treat them as second-class citizens, a number of the heroes of these warrior people joined the Confederate forces.  
 
Kepler 442b V
Kepler 442b V (it doesn’t even have a proper name): This is about as worthless as theoretically-habitable planets get.  The gravity is a little too high, the atmosphere is a little too thin, the radiation a little too high, the temperature a little too cold, and there’s no biosphere or mineral resources to speak of.  It’s kind of close to the major space lanes, but not close enough to make a convenient stop.  It is, in short, largely worthless – except as a meeting spot for smugglers and other disreputable types.  This is just an example of one of several such planets.
 
 
Serra III
Serra III is remote  from the usual trade lanes and rarely visited – except for a top-secret Alliance research facility whose purpose is unknown.  Serra III is a low-gravity world largely covered in a temperate forest of enormous ancient trees.  The Serrans who live there are officially classified as aliens, even though they appear to be rather typical low-grav, low-tech humans.  Those who have encountered the Serrans report that they are eerily intuitive, with an unusual ability to predict other people’s actions.
 
Triton III
Triton III is one of the most Earth-like planets ever discovered – except that instead of being 70% ocean, it’s closer to 95%.  The inhabitants are Aquarians – amphibious humans more comfortable in the water than out of it.  The inhabit great underwater cities, many of which offer facilities for visiting overworlders (submarine ferry service, air-filled hotels, etc.).  The Aquarians have a respectable technical base, and in particular produce some of the most corrosion-resistant gear in the galaxy.
 
Mariana VIIc
This world doesn’t look like much.  It’s a moon of a gas giant, with negligible atmosphere and surface temperatures around -200 degrees.  It’s largely covered in a thick layer of water ice.  However, under the ice is a liquid ocean which is inhabited by Aquarians.  These Aquarians have “terraformed” these deep oceans by building a network of large artificial lights which radiate in the visible spectrum, in a relatively warm area fed by very deep warm springs.  So a mile under the surface, the sea floor has a habitat surprisingly similar to that of Triton III.  They have a surprisingly rich culture, and produce some unique art and technology, but it’s not an easy place to visit and thus it’s relatively isolated.
 
Bastet III
The most populous of several worlds controlled by the Rakashans.  This world is technologically advanced, but it looks like a wilderness because its inhabitants like it that way.  Convicted criminals, prisoners of war, insolent slaves, and Red Pandarens are often set loose in this planet’s varied forests, jungles, and savannahs in order to be hunted for sport.
 
Hutchinson IV
Last stop on the major trade lanes supplying the outer worlds of the “Alliance proper,” Hutchinson is a small but fertile world. Unfortunately, high heavy metal concentrations and toxic atmosphere make it difficult to colonize. Terraforming efforts are underway, but take decades to complete. In the meantime, extensive domed facilities on the surface and the Alliance’s largest orbital station on the outer rim make it an ideal port of call for major shipping interests from the Core worlds as well as smaller independent traders carrying supplies to the Frontier worlds.

Planets

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